Archive for March, 2015

Twitter Publicly Launches Curator, Its Real-Time Search And Filtering Tool For Media Outlets

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

A terrific tool to manage you data… but just for media organisations for now #twitter #curator

TechCrunch

Twitter this morning is publicly launching Curator, its new product that lets media organizations, publishers, and broadcasters identify, filter and display tweets and Vine videos on any screen in real-time. The free service, which is something of a competitor to Storify, is designed to help those in the media industry and soon, others too, make better sense of the barrage of data on Twitter’s network in order to highlight the best content for their own readers and viewers.

The company had unveiled Curator during the News:Rewired Conference in London earlier this year, but, until now, it had not been broadly available. The product was still in beta and was being tested by a dozen or so organizations, including the NYC Mayor’s office and Italy’s major network, Mediaset.

But starting today, any media organization will now be able to get its hands on the new service, which will make integrating tweets…

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If Star Wars was a Classic 80s Anime…

Sunday, March 29th, 2015

I love the 80’s

Here's Some Awesome

It would look exactly like this! Really got me routing for the bad guys here.

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Exposing Private Facebook Photos with a Malicious App

Friday, March 20th, 2015

Just by putting numbers in the nav bar #facebook

Hackaday

[Laxman] is back again with another hack related to Facebook photos. This hack revolves around the Facebook mobile application’s “sync photos” function. This feature automatically uploads every photo taken on your mobile device to your Facebook account. These photos are automatically marked as private so that only the user can see them. The user would have to manually update the privacy settings on each photo later in order to make them available to friends or the public.

[Laxman] wanted to put these privacy restrictions to the test, so he started poking around the Facebook mobile application. He found that the Facebook app would make an HTTP GET request to a specific URL in order to retrieve the synced photos. This request was performed using a top-level access token. The Facebook server checked this token before sending down the private images. It sounds secure, but [Laxman] found a fatal flaw.

The Facebook server only…

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Content shakeout alert: Gigaom runs out of money, will shut down

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

Gigaom must shut down. What a shame, it was one of the most interesting website. #gigaom #tech

Google may separate Hangouts, Google+ and Photos

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

Is #Google realy has thrown the towel on the Google+ division? #google+